Remorseful Nero
History is inescapable, so you might as well write about it.
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Track: The Music Written on This Dude's Butt
Artist: Hieronymus Bosch
Caption:

publicdomainreview:

chaoscontrolled123:

Luke and I were looking at Hieronymus Bosch’s painting The Garden of Earthly Delights and discovered, much to our amusement, music written upon the posterior of one of the many tortured denizens of the rightmost panel of the painting which is intended to represent Hell. I decided to transcribe it into modern notation, assuming the second line of the staff is C, as is common for chants of this era.

so yes this is LITERALLY the 600-years-old butt song from hell

500 year old butt comes to musical life!

Source : chaoscontrolled123
ancientart:

The Roman Temple of Portunus, Rome, Italy, 1st century B.C.E.

The year 221 B.C.E. was a turning point both for Rome and for Roman art. Breaking with precedent, Marcellus, conqueror of the fabulously wealthy Sicilian Greek city of Syracuse, brought back to Rome not only the usual spoils of war -captured arms and armor, gold and silver coins, and the like- but also the city’s artistic patrimony. Thus began, in the words of the historian Livy, “the craze for works of Greek art.” […] Nevertheless, although the Romans developed a virtually insatiable taste for Greek “antiques,” the Etruscan basis of Roman art and architecture was never forgotten. The buildings and statues of the Roman Republic are highly eclectic, drawing on both Greek and Etruscan traditions.
Eclecticism is the primary characteristic of the Republican temple on the east bank of the Tiber popularly known as the Temple of the Fortuna Virilis. It is actually a temple dedicated to Portunus, the Roman god of harbors. Its plan follows the Etruscan pattern with a high podium and a flight of steps only at the front. Freestanding columns are confined to the deep porch. But the structure is built of stone (local tufa and travertine), overlaid originally with stucco in imitation of Greek marble.
The columns are not Tuscan but Ionic, complete with flutes and bases, and there is a matching Ionic freeze. Moreover, in an effort to approximate a peripteral Greek temple yet maintain the basic Etruscan plan, the architect added a series of engaged Ionic half columns to the sides and back of the cella. The result was a pseudoperipteral temple. Although the design combines Etruscan and Greek elements, the resultant mix is uniquely Roman.
-Gardner’s Art Through the Ages, Enhanced Edition, Volume I.

Photo courtesy & taken by Darkroom Daze.

ancientart:

The Roman Temple of Portunus, Rome, Italy, 1st century B.C.E.

The year 221 B.C.E. was a turning point both for Rome and for Roman art. Breaking with precedent, Marcellus, conqueror of the fabulously wealthy Sicilian Greek city of Syracuse, brought back to Rome not only the usual spoils of war -captured arms and armor, gold and silver coins, and the like- but also the city’s artistic patrimony. Thus began, in the words of the historian Livy, “the craze for works of Greek art.” […] Nevertheless, although the Romans developed a virtually insatiable taste for Greek “antiques,” the Etruscan basis of Roman art and architecture was never forgotten. The buildings and statues of the Roman Republic are highly eclectic, drawing on both Greek and Etruscan traditions.

Eclecticism is the primary characteristic of the Republican temple on the east bank of the Tiber popularly known as the Temple of the Fortuna Virilis. It is actually a temple dedicated to Portunus, the Roman god of harbors. Its plan follows the Etruscan pattern with a high podium and a flight of steps only at the front. Freestanding columns are confined to the deep porch. But the structure is built of stone (local tufa and travertine), overlaid originally with stucco in imitation of Greek marble.

The columns are not Tuscan but Ionic, complete with flutes and bases, and there is a matching Ionic freeze. Moreover, in an effort to approximate a peripteral Greek temple yet maintain the basic Etruscan plan, the architect added a series of engaged Ionic half columns to the sides and back of the cella. The result was a pseudoperipteral temple. Although the design combines Etruscan and Greek elements, the resultant mix is uniquely Roman.

-Gardner’s Art Through the Ages, Enhanced Edition, Volume I.

Photo courtesy & taken by Darkroom Daze.

Source : Flickr / brize
Source : back-then

drag them, b: HEY ROMANS LISTEN THE HELL UP If some armchair classicist tells you... →

clarabeau:

HEY ROMANS

LISTEN THE HELL UP

If some armchair classicist tells you Gladiator is inaccurate, Gladiator is an embarrassment to the field, whisper my name three times in a mirror and I will swoop down on that shit-for-brains like Sulla from the East, I will fill the space and darken the room…

Source : clarabeau
Source : lilacsinthedooryard
laphamsquarterly:

Don’t be afraid. “Death” is coming for you. 
We’re delighted to announce that the Fall issue of Lapham’s Quarterly will be heading your way in mid-September.
Subscribe to the Quarterly today to receive our most morbid issue yet!
Any guesses about the identity of our cover image?

laphamsquarterly:

Don’t be afraid. “Death” is coming for you. 

We’re delighted to announce that the Fall issue of Lapham’s Quarterly will be heading your way in mid-September.

Subscribe to the Quarterly today to receive our most morbid issue yet!

Any guesses about the identity of our cover image?

Source : laphamsquarterly

uispeccoll:

Follow up from our post last week featuring Autumn, the art and design blog Colossal asked to see all four volumes and posted about them today. These are scientific books on the seasons by Robert Mudie from 1837 and were donated by Charlotte Smith. See it in the catalog: http://infohawk.uiowa.edu/F/?func=find-b&find_code=SYS&local_base=UIOWA&request=002786455

See the post on Colossal! “Secret Fore-edge Paintings Revealed in Early 19th Century Books at the University of Iowa”

.

Found some of these in an Evanston, IL rare book shop in 2008.

(via drtuesdaygjohnson)

Source : uispeccoll
cydoniasan:

 Scarborough Bay, John Atkinson Grimshaw1836-1893, was a Victorian-era artist, a “remarkable and imaginative painter”known for his city night-scenes and landscapes.

cydoniasan:

 Scarborough Bay, John Atkinson Grimshaw1836-1893, was a Victorian-era artist, a “remarkable and imaginative painter”known for his city night-scenes and landscapes.

(via lyra-cepheus)

Source : cydoniasan
"In a town gone as haywire as this one, the public cries out for someone willing to probe society’s seedier corners and shine in them the red light of truth; someone who will expose what hasn’t already been exposed in the pages of a paper-wrapped magazine; someone who will unveil the perils of the modern pornocracy, while also preserving those whose lives depend on it… When dirty times call for dirty detective work, that call comes to the office of Lundqvist J. Fortnightly: Pseudo-erotic Detective."

"In a town gone as haywire as this one, the public cries out for someone willing to probe society’s seedier corners and shine in them the red light of truth; someone who will expose what hasn’t already been exposed in the pages of a paper-wrapped magazine; someone who will unveil the perils of the modern pornocracy, while also preserving those whose lives depend on it… When dirty times call for dirty detective work, that call comes to the office of Lundqvist J. Fortnightly: Pseudo-erotic Detective."

demonagerie:

Bibliothèque nationale de France, Arsenal ms. 5087, detail of f. 96v. Jean Mansel, Histoires romaines (between 1454 and 1460)  Artist: Loyset Liédet

demonagerie:

Bibliothèque nationale de France, Arsenal ms. 5087, detail of f. 96v. Jean Mansel, Histoires romaines (between 1454 and 1460) Artist: Loyset Liédet

Source : demonagerie