Remorseful Nero
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erikkwakkel:

Medieval Batman
Quite a way to test your pen: drawing a figure that looks like, well, Batman. The nib of medieval quills needed constant adjusting, cutting with a knife. In order to see if it had the right shape, the scribe would test it out on a blank page. This one is filled with such pen trials, most of them written vertically: nonsense words, elongated letters and wobbly lines, all at least 500 years old. The biggest trial, however, looks familiar: a hooded man in which we may see Batman. Long live the needy medieval pen, which produced such delightful creations!
Pic: Paris, Bibliothèque Mazarine, MS 3475 (15th century).

erikkwakkel:

Medieval Batman

Quite a way to test your pen: drawing a figure that looks like, well, Batman. The nib of medieval quills needed constant adjusting, cutting with a knife. In order to see if it had the right shape, the scribe would test it out on a blank page. This one is filled with such pen trials, most of them written vertically: nonsense words, elongated letters and wobbly lines, all at least 500 years old. The biggest trial, however, looks familiar: a hooded man in which we may see Batman. Long live the needy medieval pen, which produced such delightful creations!

Pic: Paris, Bibliothèque Mazarine, MS 3475 (15th century).

Source : erikkwakkel
Source : smuglo6ekystradalec
historical-nonfiction:

The ship-shaking device was invented by the great mathematician and inventor Archimedes around 214 BCE. The Carthaginians used the device against Roman ships’ invasions. With the help of two poles, a pulley system, and a large hook, the Carthaginians were able to successfully combat the Romans for over two years. The Romans came to fear the sight of a hook and pole dangling over an enemy wall, for they knew that once hooked, their ship would be dropped on its side or even capsized. (Ship Shaping Device, Syracuse, 214 BCE)

historical-nonfiction:

The ship-shaking device was invented by the great mathematician and inventor Archimedes around 214 BCE. The Carthaginians used the device against Roman ships’ invasions. With the help of two poles, a pulley system, and a large hook, the Carthaginians were able to successfully combat the Romans for over two years. The Romans came to fear the sight of a hook and pole dangling over an enemy wall, for they knew that once hooked, their ship would be dropped on its side or even capsized. (Ship Shaping Device, Syracuse, 214 BCE)

(via mirousworlds)

Source : smith.edu
Source : bubblypotentially
ancientart:

The interior of the hypogeum of the Volumnus family. This Etruscan tomb is located in Ponte San Giovanni in central Italy, and thought to date to approximately the 3rd century BCE.
Photo taken by CyArk.

ancientart:

The interior of the hypogeum of the Volumnus family. This Etruscan tomb is located in Ponte San Giovanni in central Italy, and thought to date to approximately the 3rd century BCE.

Photo taken by CyArk.

Source : ancientart

990000:

louvre.fr:

Helmet of a Thracian Gladiator

Troisième quart du Ier siècle ap. J.-C. Found in the gladiators’ barracks at Pompei, Campagna, southern Italy Campagna, southern Italy

This bronze helmet, richly decorated with a Gorgon’s and a griffin’s head, was probably used by Thracian gladiators during the parades preceding the games in the amphitheater at Pompeii, just before Vesuvius erupted in 79 AD. The shape of the visor, which evolved over the course of the first century, is typical of the period. The eye openings have been replaced by a grill covering the upper part of the face, and plume holders have been added on either side of the helmet.

Armor discovered at Pompeii

This bronze helmet is one of a number of pieces of armor given in 1802 to the First Consul Bonaparte by Ferdinand IV, king of Naples. They were buried when Vesuvius erupted and the region of Naples was laid waste on 24 August, AD 79, but saw the light of day when excavations were carried out (1766-67) in the gladiators’ barracks at Pompeii. They were kept at Malmaison until the death of Josephine and thereafter entered the Durand collection (1814) and the Comte de Pourtalès collection (1825), before being purchased by the Musées Impériaux in 1865. Finally, they were transferred to the Louvre from the Musée des Antiquités Nationales at Saint-Germain-en-Laye in 1892. The armor, which is richly embossed, was probably used in the parades that preceded the games in the arena.

(via mirousworlds)

Source : 990000
sakrogoat:

Pelle Swedlund - Le soleil de Rome

sakrogoat:

Pelle Swedlund - Le soleil de Rome

(via drtuesdaygjohnson)

Source : sakrogoat
I think that some aspects of military service belong to a common experience across ancient and modern civilizations — part of our human experience in general really. Things like worry and homesickness.
Source : peterspear
historical-nonfiction:

Persian cast stone horse, a reproduction of one excavated from Persepolis, ceremonial capital of the Achaemenid Empire, or First Persian Empire (550-330 BCE)

historical-nonfiction:

Persian cast stone horse, a reproduction of one excavated from Persepolis, ceremonial capital of the Achaemenid Empire, or First Persian Empire (550-330 BCE)

Source : ancientsculpturegallery.com
historical-nonfiction:

You know George Washington, right? Tall guy, beat the British, seen on every one dollar bill? Here are a few more facts about this most famous president.
he started school at six and left at fifteen, because his mother could not afford university
some of his favorite dishes were cream of peanut soup, mashed sweet potatoes with coconut, and string beans with mushrooms.
he bred hound dogs
though he personally surveyed and decided where the US capitol would be, Washington never lived in Washington
Mount Vernon, his home, is next to Jefferson’s home at Monticello, but it took half a day to get there in a carriage so they did not often visit each other

historical-nonfiction:

You know George Washington, right? Tall guy, beat the British, seen on every one dollar bill? Here are a few more facts about this most famous president.

  • he started school at six and left at fifteen, because his mother could not afford university
  • some of his favorite dishes were cream of peanut soup, mashed sweet potatoes with coconut, and string beans with mushrooms.
  • he bred hound dogs
  • though he personally surveyed and decided where the US capitol would be, Washington never lived in Washington
  • Mount Vernon, his home, is next to Jefferson’s home at Monticello, but it took half a day to get there in a carriage so they did not often visit each other
Source : scholastic.com